The Kinks – God’s Children, by Tom Fredrickson

Used to be that I’d find my summer songs on a jukebox (Queen, “Killer Queen,” 1974; Chicago, “Old Days,” 1975) or AM radio (Andrew Gold, “Lonely Boy,” 1977). But now I find them on whatever media happens to be in the car while I’m on vacation. This year the song that has me hitting . . . → Read More: The Kinks – God’s Children, by Tom Fredrickson

Jimmy Garner, RIP

Portland humanitarian and actress Gretchen Corbett played Jim Rockford’s sexy lawyer, Beth Davenport.

Sad news from the world of entertainment today.

http://online.wsj.com/articles/james-garner-tv-star-dies-aged-86-1405856731

I’ve had a variety of scattered thoughts since I heard the news an hour ago:

I just can’t believe that a man that good-looking would ever die.

He was the John . . . → Read More: Jimmy Garner, RIP

More from Swedish TV, I think‏

Actually I have no idea where this pitchy March 1964 live take of “It’s My Party” is from.  I only say Swedish TV because it has high quality black and white television images and an unresponsive audience, which are two indicators of potential Svensk involvement.

Lesley is lovely here, an ingenue in the . . . → Read More: More from Swedish TV, I think‏

Marshall Field’s Choral Society Handel’s Messiah

Over at Lost Wax Method, my cousin deftly recounts a performance of Handel’s Messiah by the Marshall Field’s Choral Society which we and some others attended in the 1980s. As an eye (and ear) witness, I can vouch for his accounts and descriptions, which are compelling and accurate. He recreates the tension, disappointment and . . . → Read More: Marshall Field’s Choral Society Handel’s Messiah

Lost Wax Method Offers Musical Advent Calendar

Lost Wax Method has put together a lovely sonic Advent Calendar which features delightful, rediscovered, seasonal music every day ’til Christmas.

See also:

The Three Greatest Recordings of Handel’s Messiah, By Don Lundell

The 20 Greatest Christmas Albums of All Time, By Don Lundell

Morten Lauridsen’s O Magnum Mysterium Sung By the Robert Shaw . . . → Read More: Lost Wax Method Offers Musical Advent Calendar

The Kendalls – Heaven’s Just a Sin Away, by Tom Fredrickson

Nothing at all creepy about a father and daughter singing about incipient adultery. Yet the clavinet somehow takes the funkiness of the situation, makes it literal, and all moral queasiness is banished: Alchemy.

– Tom Fredrickson is the proprietor of the unparalleled music blog, Lost Wax Method.

The Beach Boys – It’s a Beautiful Day

My cousin, Tom Fredrickson, is a great writer, one of the very best I’ve had the good fortune to have known. He can write with laser exactitude on any subject. He has a new blog, http://lostwaxmethod.com/, which allows him to share his considerable music knowledge with the world. Today he writes about a Beach . . . → Read More: The Beach Boys – It’s a Beautiful Day

The Archies, “Sugar Sugar,” 1969, By Tom Fredrickson

Ah, a prime piece of bubblegum.

That’s Ron Dante in the video, lead vocalist on the record. Not only did Dante (born Carmine Granito) sing lead on this, the number 1 song of 1969, but he also sang lead and backgrounds on “Tracy,” a number 9 hit by the Cufflinks. Has any . . . → Read More: The Archies, “Sugar Sugar,” 1969, By Tom Fredrickson

Cool Crazy Christmas With Homer and Jethro

Homer and Jethro were adept, first-rate jazz musicians (See Playing It Straight and It Ain’t Necessarily Square) but that’s not the music for which they’ll be primarily remembered. Instead Henry “Homer” Haynes and Kenneth “Jethro” Burns will go down in musical history as the creators of tunes such as “The Gal From Possum Holler,” . . . → Read More: Cool Crazy Christmas With Homer and Jethro

The Supremes – Happenings 45 Years Ago, By Tom Fredrickson

In retrospect, “The Happening” seemed like the moment when Motown first lost its way: the beginning of the end. A theme for a painfully unhip cinematic attempt at hipness, written by Holland-Dozier-Holland with a Hollywood hand best known for TV themes (Family Affair, Gidget, My Three Sons).* It was a formal foot in the . . . → Read More: The Supremes – Happenings 45 Years Ago, By Tom Fredrickson

Supper’s Ready – When Artists Don’t Believe Their Sacred Output, By Tom Fredrickson

Where did it come from?

Ignoring “Day by Day” (from the Godspell movie soundtrack; #13 on the Hot 100—and, yes, let us please ignore it in perpetuity), 1972 was hardly a high water mark of religious themes in pop music. And as fellow EPBer Mark Hjelm suggests, “Supper’s Ready” does not appear to . . . → Read More: Supper’s Ready – When Artists Don’t Believe Their Sacred Output, By Tom Fredrickson

The Style Council – My Ever Changing Moods – Long Hot Summer – Shout to the Top – Paul Weller Earned His Post-Jam Fun, By Tom Fredrickson

When Style Council came out with its first record, Bruce, the biggest Jam fan I knew, shook his head sadly. He may never have uttered the word, but hanging over his head was an acid green thought bubble containing the word, “sellout.” Bruce had a Mosaic sense of pop ethics, and when he came . . . → Read More: The Style Council – My Ever Changing Moods – Long Hot Summer – Shout to the Top – Paul Weller Earned His Post-Jam Fun, By Tom Fredrickson

“Well, Not Art, But Something” – STSanders Shreds Music and Humor, By Tom Fredrickson

Late to the party, as usual, but this is hilarious.

http://www.wired.com/entertainment/music/news/2007/10/shredders

The good stuff is at his website: http://stsanders.com/www/pages/videos.php

I especially like the Eagles and Queen, though the Steve Vai and Jake E Lee are works of, well, not art, but something.

– Tom Fredrickson is the proprietor of the unparalleled . . . → Read More: “Well, Not Art, But Something” – STSanders Shreds Music and Humor, By Tom Fredrickson

Perry Como – Christmas Dream – A Bit of Gemütlichkeit with Shadings of Menace, By Tom Fredrickson

Scene: A London club, summer of 1974

PRODUCER: Thank you boys for chatting with me this morning.

ANDREW LLOYD WEBER: We’re only too happy to oblige.

TIM RICE: Indeed.

PRODUCER: Tim, as you know, Andrew has been kind enough to score our film, The Odessa File. You may know the . . . → Read More: Perry Como – Christmas Dream – A Bit of Gemütlichkeit with Shadings of Menace, By Tom Fredrickson

Beach Boys – Little Saint Nick – Brian Wilson’s Creative Breakthrough, By Tom Fredrickson

What does it say about Brian Wilson that, perhaps alone among recording artists, he made his creative breakthrough in a Christmas song? When the single “Little Saint Nick” was released in the fall of 1963 Wilson had already written and recorded the touchstone ballads “Surfer Girl” and “In My Room,” but the bulk of . . . → Read More: Beach Boys – Little Saint Nick – Brian Wilson’s Creative Breakthrough, By Tom Fredrickson

Peter Gabriel Brings an Orchestra to Letterman, By Tom Fredrickson

I loved the last Peter Gabriel album, where his transcendent cover (cocreation? PG supplied the melody) of Lou Reed’s “The Power of the Heart” (which somehow quotes “Ol’ Man River” in a love song to Laurie Anderson) almost balances out the Lou-Metallica combo/car crash. Speaking of Lou, James Wolcott’s memoir of NYC in the . . . → Read More: Peter Gabriel Brings an Orchestra to Letterman, By Tom Fredrickson

The 20th Anniversary of My Bloody Valentine’s Loveless, By Tom Fredrickson

It’s the 20th anniversary of Loveless by My Bloody Valentine. It may not be anybody else’s cup of tea, but I love Loveless (though I can’t claim to know it—it is a surpassingly strange album), but it is a landmark, and Stereogum puts it as well as anyone I know:

Click here.

. . . → Read More: The 20th Anniversary of My Bloody Valentine’s Loveless, By Tom Fredrickson

The Honeycombs – Have I the Right?

(Thanks to Tom Fredrickson, proprietor of the unparalleled music blog, Lost Wax Method, for sending a link to this golden oldie.)

According to their Wikipedia entry, “The Honeycombs were an English beat/pop group, founded in 1963 in North London. The group had one chart-topping hit, the million selling “Have I the Right?”, in 1964… . . . → Read More: The Honeycombs – Have I the Right?

Vladimir Nabokov Discusses Lolita on Fifties Television, By Tom Fredrickson

Perhaps the most un-American thing about Vladimir Nabokov was his unwillingness to play at the jazz of talk show gab—even in this nearly prehistoric example. “Off the cuff” was simply not in his vast vocabulary. Whether the interview was to be published or broadcast, VN insisted on receiving the questions in advance and . . . → Read More: Vladimir Nabokov Discusses Lolita on Fifties Television, By Tom Fredrickson

Dancing the Midsummer Drunken Sailor, Swedish Style – By Tom Fredrickson

I don’t know why folk dancing should depress me so, but it does. Perhaps the lingering aftereffects of the emotional damage inflicted at a nyckelharpa festival in Dalarna one endless hot June afternoon in 1976. No 14 year old should be forced to suffer so—though I expect I’ll subject my son to some equivalent . . . → Read More: Dancing the Midsummer Drunken Sailor, Swedish Style – By Tom Fredrickson