Recent Posts

The Smiths – Well I Wonder, by Steve Stav

When I hear this song, I can smell the 80s. I can taste it. You can cut the wistfulness with a butter knife; the Beatles of my generation. Now I know why my mom would get so “weird” when a particular Roy Orbison or Everly Brothers song would come on the stereo.

. . . → Read More: The Smiths – Well I Wonder, by Steve Stav

The Smiths – Frankly, Mr. Shankly, by Knute Rimkus

I’m reading a book right now, Red or Dead, a fictionalized biography of Bill Shankly, the maniacal manager of the Liverpool football team who made it a dynasty in the English soccer league in the ’70s. I believe the Smiths were slamming him in the song “Frankly, Mr. Shankly.” Being from Manchester, which has . . . → Read More: The Smiths – Frankly, Mr. Shankly, by Knute Rimkus

The Smiths – There is a Light that Never Goes Out, by Steve Stav

I remember driving around with a good friend in her old VW bug, in the summer evenings after work. She had broken up with her longtime boyfriend, I wasn’t seeing anyone… just bored. And feeling left behind. Everyone was elsewhere. Very little money, and we were already too well-trained by our upbringing to figure . . . → Read More: The Smiths – There is a Light that Never Goes Out, by Steve Stav

CCM and Me – One Christian Discovers the Smiths and All Hell Breaks Loose, By Mitch Hurst

Resurrection Band on what looks like the Chicago elevated train.

In the fall of 1983, a group of classmates from the Moody Bible Institute went to see The Resurrection Band play a live show at the Odeon, a suburban Chicago venue that often featured the latest in Christian contemporary bands.

At the show my . . . → Read More: CCM and Me – One Christian Discovers the Smiths and All Hell Breaks Loose, By Mitch Hurst

The Smiths – Ask

More than Thriller or Sledgehammer, this is the 80s vid to which I keep returning. Not because it’s good. Or beautiful. Heavens no. It makes me sad to report that this troupe of costumed hipsters and rhythmless dancers has reached 50. As kids they were English. They’re British now. They’d never heard of Starbuck’s . . . → Read More: The Smiths – Ask