Van Morrison – Crazy Love, by Rich Horton

A couple weeks ago I was working up an acoustic arrangement of Van’s song, “Crazy Love,” for May May and me to sing with another couple. After a few passes at it, I abandoned it for a different song by a more harmony-inclined band. Despite the catchiness & simplicity of “Crazy Love,” it just . . . → Read More: Van Morrison – Crazy Love, by Rich Horton

First Loved, Then Shunned: The Zombies and Others Belong in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, by Rich Horton

After Sgt. Pepper, many of us Baby Boomers became so, uhhh, “sophisticated,” that we began sneering at many of the early British Invasion bands who served as our first introductions to rock ‘n’ roll. So many superb bands, including The Hollies and The Zombies and The Searchers, got shuffed off by us in our . . . → Read More: First Loved, Then Shunned: The Zombies and Others Belong in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, by Rich Horton

Superman’s Imaginary Stories, by Rich Horton

Back in the days before Marvel’s more “realistic” super heroes overthrew DC’s dominance in the comics marketplace, DC would sometimes feature what they referred to as “imaginary stories,” which was a rather endearing way of saying the plot pursued an alternative story arc that didn’t fit in the overall fictional continuity of the characters . . . → Read More: Superman’s Imaginary Stories, by Rich Horton

Bram Tchaikovsky – Girl of My Dreams, by Rich Horton

Last night Bill Larsen and I and a few others were sharing some musical memories from the late ’70s, and it struck me that I really can’t underestimate the cumulative effect that several records from roughly 1979 or so had on me — “Starry Eyes” (The Records), “Girl of My Dreams” (Bram Tchaikovsky), “Too . . . → Read More: Bram Tchaikovsky – Girl of My Dreams, by Rich Horton

Don’t Dis’ Ringo Starr, by Rich Horton

As rock ‘n’ roll evolved into Rock in the later Sixties, there arose a distinct category of bands, the “Superstar Bands” in which each individual member was a so-called superstar instrumentalist (Cream, Blind Faith, Led Zeppelin, for example). During that period it became rather popular to say that The Beatles and that Ringo in . . . → Read More: Don’t Dis’ Ringo Starr, by Rich Horton

The Pallid Pilgrim Recommends: FOUR FAB FILMS FROM THE 1980’s GOLDEN ERA OF BASEBALL MOVIES, by Rich Horton

The start of baseball season is still several weeks away. But in the meantime, your own Spring Training should include watching four particular fabulous baseball films from the 1980’s.

Frankly, it’s hard to go wrong with a baseball film; every decade has had great ones. But for some reason, the ’80s were a particularly . . . → Read More: The Pallid Pilgrim Recommends: FOUR FAB FILMS FROM THE 1980’s GOLDEN ERA OF BASEBALL MOVIES, by Rich Horton

Fifty Years Ago, The Beatles Launched the Sixties, by Rich Horton

50 years ago The Beatles were introduced to America. Aside from their music, which still stands on its own merits, they helped launch what we now think of as The Sixties. They didn’t start it, of course. After all, the other strands were there — the yearnings for racial equality, artistic restlessness, and a . . . → Read More: Fifty Years Ago, The Beatles Launched the Sixties, by Rich Horton

Cool Yule – The Gift That Keeps on Giving, By Rich Horton

Merry Christmas from James Nicholson and me, along with all the other artists at Optional Art who made this one of the most fun musical projects I’ve ever worked on. Originally released in 1996, Cool Yule is still an annual revisit for many. Think of it as It’s a Wonderful Life meets A Peanuts . . . → Read More: Cool Yule – The Gift That Keeps on Giving, By Rich Horton

Markus Horton – Planet, By Rich Horton

Not that I have anything against bluegrass (a lot of which I love), but this banjo riff is closer to something you might hear from Andy Partridge and XTC than Union Station. Another terrific acoustitristic song from my favorite brother, Mark Horton.

– Rich Horton

Lesley Gore – You Don’t Own Me, By Rich Horton

“You Don’t Own Me” was a great pre-feminist pop nugget from 1964. But it’s ironic now, nearly 50 years later, that we need reminders from a song this old. Then again, Lesley Gore was ahead of her time.

– Rich Horton

. . . → Read More: Lesley Gore – You Don’t Own Me, By Rich Horton

Brian Setzer – Route 66, By Rich Horton

I love “Route 66” (the road, the song and the TV series), I love Brian Setzer, and I love the sound of a Gretsch guitar. It all works here.

– Rich Horton

Grand Funk Railroad – We’re An American Band LIVE – 1974, By Pat Thomas

This youtube clip has had 1,580,728 people watch it (as of 7/10/12), can they all be wrong? You decide, cast your vote now…

– Pat Thomas is the author of the recently released work, Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power 1965-1975

Just when I’d come to believe I . . . → Read More: Grand Funk Railroad – We’re An American Band LIVE – 1974, By Pat Thomas

Speaking of Nick Lowe Production Masterpieces, By Rich Horton and Eduard P. Gomez

[Your comments are appreciated, what are some other great moments from Nick Lowe’s career? Please join in below.]

For my money, “Bring the Family” by John Hiatt (1987) is Nick Lowe’s production highlight. Lowe’s production of this record (like most of his productions) perfectly suits Hiatt’s songs and arrangements. Only the barest production tricks . . . → Read More: Speaking of Nick Lowe Production Masterpieces, By Rich Horton and Eduard P. Gomez

Sam Phillips – Broken Circle, By Rich Horton

She’s probably been one of the most adventurous artists of the past 25 years, dipping her toe in more genre-stretching experimentation than almost anyone I can think of and still maintaining a solid melodic & harmonic core. Usually, her experiments have succeeded, but even her “failures” have been noble. The pity is that most . . . → Read More: Sam Phillips – Broken Circle, By Rich Horton

Davy Jones, the Diminutive “Cute One” of The Monkees is Dead at 66, By Rich Horton

Davy Jones, the diminutive “cute one” of The Monkees, has died. He was 66.

There was a time in the mid-’60s, roughly following the releases of “Rubber Soul” and “Pet Sounds,” when the rock audience grew up. Or, at least, we thought we had. In any event, we became rock-snobs and started looking down . . . → Read More: Davy Jones, the Diminutive “Cute One” of The Monkees is Dead at 66, By Rich Horton

Dusty Springfield – Son of a Preacher Man, By Rich Horton

As the son of a preacher myself, when Dusty Springfield first released this record, I fancied it was about me — which was pure narcissism on my part, to say the least. Aside from that, it’s still a great record, and Dusty was at her peak when she made it.

– Rich Horton

. . . → Read More: Dusty Springfield – Son of a Preacher Man, By Rich Horton

REM Breaks Up After 31 Years as a Band – Reactions Pour in From Around the World

http://youtu.be/qAkubiZhly4

“To our Fans and Friends: As R.E.M., and as lifelong friends and co-conspirators, we have decided to call it a day as a band. We walk away with a great sense of gratitude, of finality, and of astonishment at all we have accomplished. To anyone who ever felt touched by our music, our . . . → Read More: REM Breaks Up After 31 Years as a Band – Reactions Pour in From Around the World

RIP Andrew Gold, by Rich Horton

RIP, Andrew Gold. Many in the public probably think of Gold as the guy who had a couple minor hits back in the day, “Lonely Boy” and “Thank You For Being A Friend,” but he was the musical instrumental, arranging, and production genius behind many of the big name pop & rock stars of . . . → Read More: RIP Andrew Gold, by Rich Horton

The Unwisdom of Elites – Rich Horton ft. Paul Krugman

We common folk and our pesky entitlements are being blamed for the debt & deficit disaster. But when Bush came into office, we had a surplus that was quickly erased by (1) unfunded tax cuts that primarily went to the wealthy, (2) two simultaneous wars, and (3) a recession that was directly attributable to . . . → Read More: The Unwisdom of Elites – Rich Horton ft. Paul Krugman

RICHIE’S REPRISAL: IN PRAISE OF THE 3-MINUTE SINGLE DURING AM RADIO’S PSYCHEDELIC ERA: Notes from the Pallid Pilgrim, Rich Horton

Up until the late 1960’s it was rare that a Top 40 hit single broke the three-minute mark. Sure, there were exceptions, such as Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone” and The Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” both of which ran well over three minutes. But so much was exceeding the three-minute . . . → Read More: RICHIE’S REPRISAL: IN PRAISE OF THE 3-MINUTE SINGLE DURING AM RADIO’S PSYCHEDELIC ERA: Notes from the Pallid Pilgrim, Rich Horton