Robert Plant – Lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar, by Pat Thomas

Listening to the new Robert Plant album Lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar and while it’s not nearly as captivating as 2010’s Band of Joy (which ranks with Plant’s best work ever) – this new one, at this stage in his nearly 50 year career is fairly fresh and different from previous work. Quality-wise, I’d . . . → Read More: Robert Plant – Lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar, by Pat Thomas

Cat Stevens New Album – Tell ‘Em I’m Gone, by Pat Thomas

The new “Cat Stevens” album isn’t as good as I thought it would be – it’s about 20x times better! Also pleased to hear “Cat” questioning some of his spiritual beliefs and most surprising, blues music with the likes of Charlie Musselwhite on harmonica. And fellow traveler Richard Thompson makes an appearance.

. . . → Read More: Cat Stevens New Album – Tell ‘Em I’m Gone, by Pat Thomas

Jack Bruce RIP, by Pat Thomas

There are unconfirmed reports that bassist/vocalist Jack Bruce is dead. Frankly, that matters little, as I’ve enjoyed his presence for decades and it won’t diminish now. I carry a copy of his solo LPs “Songs For a Tailor” and “Harmony Row” with me at all times. As a teenager, those Cream records became rooted . . . → Read More: Jack Bruce RIP, by Pat Thomas

Quincy Jones – Smackwater Jack, What’s Goin’ On, by Pat Thomas

1971: Quincy and heavy friends ‘sing’ Carole King, Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On, and more. Nearly every jazz and studio musician in NYC and LA played on this – from Freddie Hubbard to Joe Beck to Jimmy Smith to Carole Kaye with Paul Beaver on moog, Toots Thielmans on harp.

– Pat Thomas . . . → Read More: Quincy Jones – Smackwater Jack, What’s Goin’ On, by Pat Thomas

Neil Diamond – The Pot Smoker’s Song, by Pat Thomas

Considered so ‘uncool’ – he’s totally cool, during this 1968 to 1972 period when he recorded for Uni Records. Besides the highly-crafted hits, there’s the occasional Fred Neil or Joni Mitchell cover, but the highlight is always his own tunes, wacky sh*t like “The Pot Smokers Song” – every one of them perfectly played . . . → Read More: Neil Diamond – The Pot Smoker’s Song, by Pat Thomas

Revolution and Street Fighting Man Coincidentally Rock 1968 Chicago Protests, by Pat Thomas

Interesting to note that during the week of the protests at the Chicago Democratic Convention in ’68, the Beatles released “Revolution” and the Stones “Street Fighting Man” as singles.

– Pat Thomas is the author of Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power 1965-1975.

Van Morrison – Linden Arden Stole the Highlights, by Pat Thomas

40 years ago today, Van Morrison released the Veedon Fleece album – for every person who moans that Van never recorded another Astral Weeks – this album is for you. For everyone who claims Van is an “old git” – but thinks that someone like Robyn Hitchcock is still relevant, then keep in mind . . . → Read More: Van Morrison – Linden Arden Stole the Highlights, by Pat Thomas

Shaun Cassidy – So Sad About Us, by Pat Thomas

We all remember Shaun Cassidy as a 70’s “teen idol” – but we tend to forget his 1980 exploration into “new wave / punk” with his “Wasp” album produced by Todd Rundgren with Todd & Utopia as the backing band – they cover songs by Bowie, Talking Heads, the Animals, and Ian Hunter. There’s . . . → Read More: Shaun Cassidy – So Sad About Us, by Pat Thomas

Pat Thomas, Ron Johnson and Gary Perry to Discuss Legacy of the 1965 Watts Riots, the LA Rebellion and Social Justice, Reviving a Cultural, Social, Artistic and Political Framework on March 23 at 6PM, New Time

The lecture in which Pat Thomas will participate, sponsored by the Northwest Film Forum on 1960s/1970’s underground African American films on Saturday March 23rd in Seattle has been changed from 8 pm to 6 pm – the NEW time for this free event is 6 pm !

After two trips to London (May and . . . → Read More: Pat Thomas, Ron Johnson and Gary Perry to Discuss Legacy of the 1965 Watts Riots, the LA Rebellion and Social Justice, Reviving a Cultural, Social, Artistic and Political Framework on March 23 at 6PM, New Time

Pat Thomas, Ron Johnson and Gary Perry to Discuss Legacy of the 1965 Watts Riots, the LA Rebellion and Social Justice, Reviving a Cultural, Social, Artistic and Political Framework on March 23 at 6PM, New Time

The lecture in which Pat Thomas will participate, sponsored by the Northwest Film Forum on 1960s/1970’s underground African American films on Saturday March 23rd in Seattle has been changed from 8 pm to 6 pm – the NEW time for this free event is 6 pm !

After two trips to London (May and . . . → Read More: Pat Thomas, Ron Johnson and Gary Perry to Discuss Legacy of the 1965 Watts Riots, the LA Rebellion and Social Justice, Reviving a Cultural, Social, Artistic and Political Framework on March 23 at 6PM, New Time

Led Zeppelin – White Summer, By Pat Thomas

This solo/instrumental song, “White Summer,” from 1970, was never on any of their original LPs – but captures perfectly Page’s ability to borrow and steal and make it his own. Yes, I know he got some riffs from Bert Jansch, which Jansch got from Anne Briggs, and let’s not forgot Davy Graham and several . . . → Read More: Led Zeppelin – White Summer, By Pat Thomas

The Who’s Next Monolith, By Pat Thomas

This is the kind of movie that I can get behind, one that documents the Who’s Next Monolith. According to photographer Ethan Russell, most of the members were unable to urinate, so rainwater was tipped from an empty film canister to achieve the desired effect. The striking, partially cloudy sky seen above the site . . . → Read More: The Who’s Next Monolith, By Pat Thomas

On the Road – Nick Drake – Led Zeppelin – Review Thoughts By Pat Thomas

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by Facebook…

Years ago I argued with a friend over the Nick Drake “Pink Moon” VW commercial. While I don’t like hearing my favorite artists used like that, I did feel that Drake had such a small following before the commercial that anything to bring . . . → Read More: On the Road – Nick Drake – Led Zeppelin – Review Thoughts By Pat Thomas

Christine McVie – I’d Rather Go Blind, By Pat Thomas

Yes, this song BELONGS to Etta James (her version is the ONLY version), but my favorite cover of it, is this one by Christine McVie circa 1970 (last night, some woman who I didn’t catch the name of, absolutely butchered it “in tribute” to Buddy Guy. She over-sang it, the key is to ‘under-sing’ . . . → Read More: Christine McVie – I’d Rather Go Blind, By Pat Thomas

Little Walter – Key To The Highway, By Pat Thomas

August 1958, Chess Records, Little Walter’s version of the Big Bill Broonzy classic – Paul Butterfield said that when he heard this, it forever changed his perception of the relationship between the harmonica to the human voice.

– Pat Thomas is the author of the recently released work, Listen, Whitey! The Sights and . . . → Read More: Little Walter – Key To The Highway, By Pat Thomas

Kerouac’s On the Road to Hit the Big Screen, By Pat Thomas

It’s taken several decades, but maybe, someone has finally made Jack Kerouac‘s 1957 novel On The Road into a credible Hollywood film. This LA Times article tells the story of all the ups and downs along the way….

– Pat Thomas is the author of the recently released work, Listen, Whitey! The Sights . . . → Read More: Kerouac’s On the Road to Hit the Big Screen, By Pat Thomas

Rod Stewart – Gasoline Alley, By Pat Thomas

You’ve heard Rod Stewart sing “Gasoline Alley” many times, but check out this 1970 German TV performance in which he sings a sublime, unaccompanied, a cappella version.

– Pat Thomas is the author of the recently released work, Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power 1965-1975. The companion disc for the book . . . → Read More: Rod Stewart – Gasoline Alley, By Pat Thomas

The Muddy Waters Woodstock Album, By John Siscoe and Pat Thomas

When stars start to dim, producers tend to flail about, and strange music can result. By 1975, as Muddy’s sales figures were in decline, he became the first customer for Levon Helms’ Woodstock studio. Backed up by members of his own band, together with Levon Helm, Garth Hudson, Paul Butterfield, and some accomplished . . . → Read More: The Muddy Waters Woodstock Album, By John Siscoe and Pat Thomas

Records Collecting Dust, By Pat Thomas

If somebody had told me that someday I’d appear in the same documentary movie as Chuck Dukowski of Black Flag and Keith Morris of the Circle Jerks talking about obsessive record collecting, I would have said “you’re high, you’ve very very high.” Yet today I was filmed talking about Black Power, they’re talking about . . . → Read More: Records Collecting Dust, By Pat Thomas

Allen Ginsberg Sings William Blake’s “The Nurse’s Song,” By Pat Thomas

Poet and mystic William Blake was considered a madman by his contemporaries. His work received little attention while he was alive. I didn’t became aware of Blake until I plugged into Allen Ginsberg’s versions of Blake via Ginsberg’s song/poems – and via Van Morrison’s Sense of Wonder and Veedon Fleece albums where Van quotes . . . → Read More: Allen Ginsberg Sings William Blake’s “The Nurse’s Song,” By Pat Thomas