Georgie Fame – Rhythm and Blues at the Flamingo, by Pat Thomas

I’ve been trying to get my hands on this album for decades, today is the day I’ve got it in my hands! Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames live at The Flamingo Club in September 1963 recorded by Glyn Johns. The music has been described as involving “distinctly sensuous body movements and even the . . . → Read More: Georgie Fame – Rhythm and Blues at the Flamingo, by Pat Thomas

Robert Plant and Rockpile – Little Sister – Concerts for Kampuchea, by Pat Thomas

December 1979’s Concerts for Kampuchea, a fairly successful meeting between 70s classic rock in its final breaths and a crop of ‘new wave’ bands starting to hit commercial success. Plant was the only old dude to mix it up with a ‘contemporary’ band – although nobody thought about it at the time – Rockpile’s . . . → Read More: Robert Plant and Rockpile – Little Sister – Concerts for Kampuchea, by Pat Thomas

Frank Sinatra – Sweet Blindness, by Pat Thomas

Frank Sinatra in 1968 singing Laura Nyro’s “Sweet Blindness” (from Eli and the Thirteenth Confession) dressed as the 6th member of the 5th Dimension – let’s go down by the grapevine, drink my daddy’s wine, get happy!

– Pat Thomas is the author of Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power . . . → Read More: Frank Sinatra – Sweet Blindness, by Pat Thomas

Millie – Mayfair, by Pat Thomas

Only took me about 30 years to find this album by Millie – the very first known Nick Drake cover version – a jaunty rocksteady / ska version of the song “Mayfair” was recorded before Nick’s own version that appears on Nick’s debut album, Five Leaves Left. Must be heard to be believed.

. . . → Read More: Millie – Mayfair, by Pat Thomas

Gene Clark – Los Angeles, by Pat Thomas

While others make the pilgrimage to genuflect inside Room #8 at Joshua Tree Inn for Gram – you’ll find me in Tipton, sitting under a headstone inscribed “Harold Eugene Clark – No Other.” Today is Gene Clark’s birthday and nobody ever captured the LA experience as poignantly as he did with this.

. . . → Read More: Gene Clark – Los Angeles, by Pat Thomas

John Renbourn – Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out, by Pat Thomas

John Renbourn never enjoyed the 20-something beard-driven renaissance of his pal Bert Jansch in Ballard, Brooklyn, Silver Lake or Oakland – but this new 20 song collection of all unreleased early 60’s recordings should help – Beverly Martyn (John’s wife) sings on a few cuts, while Davy Graham and Mac MacLeod sit in on . . . → Read More: John Renbourn – Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out, by Pat Thomas

Porter Wagoner – The Rubber Room, by Pat Thomas

In 1971, Porter Wagoner recorded this perfect description of “The Rubber Room.” You might describe it as “psych-country.” It’s certainly not a pop song. As Waylon Jennings once said, Porter “couldn’t go pop with a mouthful of firecrackers.”

– Pat Thomas is the author of Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black . . . → Read More: Porter Wagoner – The Rubber Room, by Pat Thomas

Rod Stewart – Hot Legs, by Pat Thomas

You can trace the cultural landscape of the 70s – by mirroring it to the music of Rod Stewart – the decade begins with the sublime British folk and American ‘roots-music’ influenced solo albums running parallel with the blues based swagger of his Faces recordings (a good time was had by all) – then . . . → Read More: Rod Stewart – Hot Legs, by Pat Thomas

Chris Cacavas – Angel on a Mattress Spring, by Pat Thomas

When Steve Wynn finished producing Chris Cacavas debut solo album in early 1989, I took the master tapes over to the offices of CMJ; College Music Journal. I played this song for the editor and he smiled and looked at me and said “holy shit, this sounds like the Buffalo Springfield jamming with Steppenwolf”. . . . → Read More: Chris Cacavas – Angel on a Mattress Spring, by Pat Thomas

30 Bands I’ve Never Shared a Stage With, by Pat Thomas

Pat Thomas at Big Pink

Here are 30 bands that I’ve NEVER shared a stage or dressing room with – and I’m totally at peace with that:

1) Pavement 2) Thurston Moore 3) Bonnie Prince Billy 4) Kid Rock 5) Tool 6) Helmet 7) Fleet Foxes 8) Rem (after Bill Berry left) 9) Replacements . . . → Read More: 30 Bands I’ve Never Shared a Stage With, by Pat Thomas

Jackson C. Frank – The Complete Recordings, by Pat Thomas

Every couple of years, a new generation discovers folk singer/songwriter Jackson C. Frank – and gets all obsessive about him – similar to Nick Drake, Judee Sill, (and for reasons I’ve never understood) Vashti Bunyan – and yet, oddly not enough people do that with Sandy Denny. Anyway Frank is worth some obsessing – . . . → Read More: Jackson C. Frank – The Complete Recordings, by Pat Thomas

Bob Dylan – Stadiums of the Damned, by Pat Thomas

Blending the gospel with the secular; Dylan in New Orleans, November 1981: This show was recorded for a proposed live album, which was never issued (apart from “Heart of Mine”, which appeared on Biograph), Dylan scholar Paul Williams calls this “one of his most inventive tours”, and the setlist — which mixes songs from . . . → Read More: Bob Dylan – Stadiums of the Damned, by Pat Thomas

Chuck Prophet – Brighton 1993 Savannah, by Pat Thomas

I had been a resident of San Francisco for all of 24 hrs when I strolled into a South of Market bar in October 1987 and spotted Chuck Prophet propping up a bar stool. I sat down, didn’t introduce myself, then started making comments and asking questions about the other members of Green On . . . → Read More: Chuck Prophet – Brighton 1993 Savannah, by Pat Thomas

Elvis Presley – Suspicious Minds Live 1973, by Pat Thomas

I clearly remember Peter Holsapple and DB’s playing “Suspicious Minds” at Scorgies in Rochester, NY circa 1984 and Peter making an impassioned plee for folks not to believe all the myth and horseshit of Elvis and just dig the music – that made a strong impression on me. During that era doing an Elvis . . . → Read More: Elvis Presley – Suspicious Minds Live 1973, by Pat Thomas

Karin Krog – We Could Be Flying, by Pat Thomas

In New York City, a gig with Norwegian jazz singer Karin Krog joined by piano maverick Steve Kuhn for $14 is almost “free” – at Joe’s Pub on Wednesday September 30th, at 7:30 pm (one set only) – I think I may even roll into town for this. Click here for ticket info. Here’s . . . → Read More: Karin Krog – We Could Be Flying, by Pat Thomas

David Ruffin – I Want You Back, by Pat Thomas

I’ve always preferred men over boys and women rather than girls, so when I heard this ‘adult’ version of the Jackson 5 bubblegum hit (recorded just a few months after young Michael took it to the top), I asked myself ‘why in the hell’ did Motown sit on releasing it for 34 years ? . . . → Read More: David Ruffin – I Want You Back, by Pat Thomas

John Lennon – Attica State (LIVE) – Apollo Theatre – New York City, by Pat Thomas

At 8:20 a.m. on September 9, 1971 the Attica Prison riot began. At 9:45 AM on September 13, tear gas was dropped into the yard and New York State Police troopers opened fire non-stop for two minutes into the smoke. by the time the facility was retaken, 10 hostages (Nine of them Prison guards . . . → Read More: John Lennon – Attica State (LIVE) – Apollo Theatre – New York City, by Pat Thomas

Chris Wood – Vulcan, by Pat Thomas

This might be on Spotify but I went out and bought this 1974 unreleased album by the late Chris Wood on CD. Wood was the flautist and saxophonist of Traffic. Recorded just after the demise of Traffic in 1974, Vulcan was begun for Island records but shelved in 1978. The sessions featured contributions from . . . → Read More: Chris Wood – Vulcan, by Pat Thomas

This Wack-job Changed My Life, by Pat Thomas

Keith Moon – this wack-job changed my life – the hours I spent as a teenager listening to every note that came out of his drum set and trying to emulate his sound and style caused me to get kicked out of bands in high school, got me praised occasionally in more recent years, . . . → Read More: This Wack-job Changed My Life, by Pat Thomas

Maxine Nightingale – Right Back Where We Started From, by Pat Thomas

In the mid-70’s, my parents had a Volvo 122-S that they’d bought new in ’64. It was still running strong and had only an AM radio in it – which every 30 minutes seem to play this song during 1975-1976.

– Pat Thomas is the author of Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds . . . → Read More: Maxine Nightingale – Right Back Where We Started From, by Pat Thomas