This Wack-job Changed My Life, by Pat Thomas

Keith Moon – this wack-job changed my life – the hours I spent as a teenager listening to every note that came out of his drum set and trying to emulate his sound and style caused me to get kicked out of bands in high school, got me praised occasionally in more recent years, . . . → Read More: This Wack-job Changed My Life, by Pat Thomas

Maxine Nightingale – Right Back Where We Started From, by Pat Thomas

In the mid-70’s, my parents had a Volvo 122-S that they’d bought new in ’64. It was still running strong and had only an AM radio in it – which every 30 minutes seem to play this song during 1975-1976.

– Pat Thomas is the author of Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds . . . → Read More: Maxine Nightingale – Right Back Where We Started From, by Pat Thomas

Oral History of British Folk Music a Must Read, by Pat Thomas

Singing from the Floor: A History of British Folk Clubs is the first ever “oral history” of the British folk scene with expressive quotes from Martin Carthy, Shirley Collins, the Watersons, Ashley Hutchings, Wizz Jones, Dave Swarbrick, June Tabor, Maddy Prior, Joe Boyd, Richard Thompson, Clive Palmer – utterly inspiring and essential.

. . . → Read More: Oral History of British Folk Music a Must Read, by Pat Thomas

Van Morrison – Cold Wind in August, by Pat Thomas

It was a “Cold wind in August” with Mick Ronson on guitar, Dr. John on piano – excellent live video footage from 1977.

– Pat Thomas is the author of Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power 1965-1975.

Alex Chilton – Just to See You, by Pat Thomas

Recorded in the summer of 1969 at 1457 National Street in Memphis with Terry Manning on bass, Richard Rosebrough on drums, and Jeff Newman on steel guitar. Produced and engineered by Terry Manning (who had mixed Led Zeppelin III that summer at the same Memphis location). Manning and Chilton flew to LA with the . . . → Read More: Alex Chilton – Just to See You, by Pat Thomas

Alice Coltrane – Turiya Sings, by Pat Thomas

If 1970’s Journey in Satchidananda was a game changer for you – then prepare yourself for this obscure 1982 ‘cassette only’ release just out on CD. Alice Coltrane‘s vocals are ‘other worldly’ as if she made up her own language (in the form of Vedic Chants) – it’s a spiritual message drowned in a . . . → Read More: Alice Coltrane – Turiya Sings, by Pat Thomas

Anne Murray, Glen Campbell – Let Me Be the One, by Pat Thomas

This 1971 combination [album] is a bit of a rocky road – the medley of “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” & “I Say a Little Prayer” is moronic, but you do get their version of the Brotherhood of Man’s 1970 hit “United We Stand”. There’s also some Randy Newman and Hoyt Axton . . . → Read More: Anne Murray, Glen Campbell – Let Me Be the One, by Pat Thomas

Lyres – Help You Ann, by Pat Thomas

Garage rock in the 80’s and beyond was always very hit and miss for me – often miss. But when I heard this and saw MonoMan do it live – I thought to myself, this is “god-like.”

– Pat Thomas is the author of Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power . . . → Read More: Lyres – Help You Ann, by Pat Thomas

Beyond the Life of Brian, Beach Boys Article, by Pat Thomas

I recently had dinner with longtime Beach Boy Bruce Johnston – just happened to sit next to him and he was eating alone. 90 minutes of him honestly answering any question – he was egoless, sincere, with no axes to grind with Brian Wilson or anyone else. Given all the wacko shit he’s witnessed . . . → Read More: Beyond the Life of Brian, Beach Boys Article, by Pat Thomas

Mark Blake – Pretend You’re in a War: The Who and the Sixties, by Pat Thomas

Starting in the early 70s, I’ve never had a casual relationship with The Who – just like I’ve never had a casual connection to my head, heart or groin. The Who always exemplified the visceral, mercurial, macho, homoerotic, thunderous, vulnerable side of rock music, they made me feel more alive reflecting my changing moods. . . . → Read More: Mark Blake – Pretend You’re in a War: The Who and the Sixties, by Pat Thomas

John Belushi & Dan Aykroyd take Brian Wilson Surfing 1976, by Pat Thomas

Easily the highlight from the mid-70’s “Brian’s Back” promotional campaign, this was done to celebrate the Beach Boys’ 15th anniversary and to promote their album, 15 Big Ones. John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd play a pair of California Highway Patrol officers who burst into the bedroom of Wilson’s Bel Air home and force him . . . → Read More: John Belushi & Dan Aykroyd take Brian Wilson Surfing 1976, by Pat Thomas

Tim Buckley – Live at the Troubadour 1969, by Pat Thomas

While Dream Letter remains the definitive live Tim Buckley album, I often prefer Live at the Troubadour 1969 recorded a year later. A year was a long time in the arc of his art, which now blended folky Tim with jazzy Tim, funky Tim, oversexed (but still horny) Tim, speedball (heroin meets coke) Tim . . . → Read More: Tim Buckley – Live at the Troubadour 1969, by Pat Thomas

Miles Davis – Guinnevere, by Pat Thomas

Today is Miles Davis’ birthday – as Joe Zawinul said about him “a genius isn’t someone who invents one great thing and keeps doing it over and over again, a genius is someone who keeps changing and evolving” – In 1970 Miles and company (including tabla and sitar) cut a version of Crosby Stills . . . → Read More: Miles Davis – Guinnevere, by Pat Thomas

Come On People, It’s Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks, by Pat Thomas

Recently, a new article about the origins of Van Morrison‘s Astral Weeks was making the rounds of Facebook, here’s a few words that I’ve jotted down on how I “hear” that album: I’ve never understood why people feel the need to expand the tale (and myth) of Astral Weeks. It’s perfect just the way . . . → Read More: Come On People, It’s Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks, by Pat Thomas

28th Day – 25 Pills, by Pat Thomas

In the 1980’s there were a handful of life-changing records. Not just records that I loved -but ones that caused me to actually make changes in my life. The Dream Syndicate inspired me to move to California. The Rain Parade is partially why I got into the music business. One record that also affected . . . → Read More: 28th Day – 25 Pills, by Pat Thomas

Lambert & Stamp Who Documentary, by Pat Thomas

No thanks to Mojo, all classic rock bands have been covered to death. So the most interesting action is now the ‘sidebar’ stories. The Beatles Good Ol’ Freda movie was better than covering Sgt. Pepper for the 1000th time! With that in mind, this NEW movie is a gift for WHO fans. for anyone . . . → Read More: Lambert & Stamp Who Documentary, by Pat Thomas

Invitation To Openness: The Jazz & Soul Photography Of Les McCann 1960-1980

Fantagraphics Books has just released Invitation To Openness: The Jazz & Soul Photography Of Les McCann 1960-1980 a beautiful hardcover coffee table book which collects the photographs of legendary musician Les McCann; he documented the jazz and soul scene —across several decades. All of them previously unpublished until now. Perhaps the largest collection of . . . → Read More: Invitation To Openness: The Jazz & Soul Photography Of Les McCann 1960-1980

Van Morrison’s Moondance: A Perfect Album, by Pat Thomas

45 years ago today, 2/28/1970 – Van Morrison released the Moondance album. I jotted down a few thoughts on what I think in 2015.

Van Morrison’s second Warner Brothers album is so good; it arguably could have been a ‘best of’ collection. One of those rare records in which there’s no bad tracks. At . . . → Read More: Van Morrison’s Moondance: A Perfect Album, by Pat Thomas

Frida Ensam, by Pat Thomas

I’ve never understood the fascination that my friends have for ABBA. My ABBA compilation, would be a 4 song EP. Their music is a piece of chalk marinated in vinegar. However, I have a soft-spot for the 1975 Frida ensam (“Frida Alone”) LP. Sung all in Swedish, it includes versions of Bowie’s “Liv på . . . → Read More: Frida Ensam, by Pat Thomas

Records Collecting Dust Movie Coming to Portland Feb. 11, by Pat Thomas

Was interesting to hear in both the movie and the panel discussion afterwards last night in LA, how many “punk legends” got inspired by “prog-rock” in the early 70’s. Great discussion by Jello Biafra about Hawkwind and Keith Morris praising Yes, King Crimson, etc. He wasn’t mentioned but John Lydon also went down that . . . → Read More: Records Collecting Dust Movie Coming to Portland Feb. 11, by Pat Thomas