Eating From Your Yard: Roses, by Jill Kuhel

Tuesday eating from your yard tip~In 2012 rose was the herb of the year. So our local herb society had a speaker come in from the rose society to talk about roses. It quickly became apparent that while rose society people strive to grow the perfect rose, herb society people were more interested in . . . → Read More: Eating From Your Yard: Roses, by Jill Kuhel

Eating From Your Yard: Lemon Balm, by Jill Kuhel

Eating from your yard tip ~ Lemon balm aka Melissa crushed in your hand and left in a pitcher of water overnight in the refrigerator makes a lovely mother’s little helper tea to calm and brighten the mood of both mother and child. Chop up fresh lemon balm to add to your green or . . . → Read More: Eating From Your Yard: Lemon Balm, by Jill Kuhel

Eating From Your Yard Tip: Purslane, by Jill Kuhel

Tuesday eating from your yard tip~Purslane has more omega 3 than any other leafy green. Look no further than the crack in your sidewalk to find purslane thriving. While many Americans view purslane as a lowly weed, purslane is eaten all over the world. It is baked in bread, pickled and added to soups, . . . → Read More: Eating From Your Yard Tip: Purslane, by Jill Kuhel

Eating From Your Yard Tip: Wood Sorrel, by Jill Kuhel

Tuesday eating from your yard tip~just step outside and odds are good you will find wood sorrel. Gladys Jeurink, an old respected gardener in my town, advised to leave it in my garden because the rabbits prefer it over other plants and will eat it and not your plants. Little did I know at . . . → Read More: Eating From Your Yard Tip: Wood Sorrel, by Jill Kuhel

Eating From Your Yard Tip: Garlic Scapes, by Jill Kuhel

There are few things I love more than garlic. Garlic scapes prime our taste buds for July’s garlic harvest. The scapes are the seed head forming above the garlic plant. By cutting off the scape all the energy is directed to creating the most fabulous garlic bulb. Scapes even come with their own handle . . . → Read More: Eating From Your Yard Tip: Garlic Scapes, by Jill Kuhel

Eating From Your Yard Tip: Lavender, by Jill Kuhel

I had used lavender to induce sleep, relieve headaches and for it’s anti~bacterial properties, but the first time I remember eating lavender was a lavender chocolate truffle. When I asked about how it was made she referred to lavender flower, but English is tricky and I was born blonde so I heard lavender flour. . . . → Read More: Eating From Your Yard Tip: Lavender, by Jill Kuhel

Elder Blow Has a Light Fragrant Taste, But Packs a Cold Fighting Punch, by Jill Kuhel

The elderberry bush produces lovely clusters of white flowers, which later turn into deep purple immune boosting fruit. The trick is to knock the flower heads a bit so the white flowers fall off with a whole in the center (this is the elder blow) leaving a little white part still attached to the . . . → Read More: Elder Blow Has a Light Fragrant Taste, But Packs a Cold Fighting Punch, by Jill Kuhel

Strawberries Rarely Make it into the House, by Jill Kuhel

Pick the strawberry and eat! Boom. Drop the mic. At our house strawberries rarely make it into the house to make anything with them. We have several kinds of strawberries in the yard ripe and ready to eat. The white alpine strawberry, which is soft and tastes pineapple-ish, is the kid’s favorite. At the . . . → Read More: Strawberries Rarely Make it into the House, by Jill Kuhel

Mint: Easy to Grow, Endless Culinary Possibilities, by Jill Kuhel

Tuesday eating from your yard tip~Mint comes in many varieties all with different tastes to compliment our food and aid in digestion. My walking partner, Maria Baher-Olomi, serves baked slices egg plant with a yogurt and spearmint sauce~pure heaven! Mint is also an important ingredient in the cucumber yogurt sauce served with gyros and . . . → Read More: Mint: Easy to Grow, Endless Culinary Possibilities, by Jill Kuhel

No Meat on These Lambs Quarters, by Jill Kuhel

If you have any open dirt you most likely have lambs~quarters. Consider it a free gift to fill your tummy. The cooked leaves and soaked seeds are edible. The young leaves are tender, but like all of us get tougher with age so pick them when they are below 8 inches. Roger Welsch in . . . → Read More: No Meat on These Lambs Quarters, by Jill Kuhel

Live and Let Chive, by Jill Kuhel

Onion chives in full bloom

Onion chives are one of my top five herbs. Both the leaves and flowers are edible. The flowers especially have a subtle onion flavor making them both visually and pallet pleasing. My friend Chong Knievel said that in Korea they eat chives in the spring to clean their blood. . . . → Read More: Live and Let Chive, by Jill Kuhel

Stinging Nettles: Wholesome and Delectable, by Jill Kuhel

Stinging Nettles

Stinging nettles, when prepared properly, are a storehouse of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron etc etc. Any dish you would make with cooked spinach can be made with stinging nettles. The leaves and stems are picked in the spring when the plants are less than 6″ tall wearing gloves to protect you from . . . → Read More: Stinging Nettles: Wholesome and Delectable, by Jill Kuhel

Roasted Dandelion Root Smells Like Chocolate Chip Cookies Baking and the Best Syrup You’ve Ever Tasted, by Jill Kuhel

It took 1/2 hour to pick the dandelions.

Tuesday eating from your yard tip~Dandelions are a treasure trove of potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, vitamin A,C,K and B6. The flowers, leaves and roots are edible. The green parts are bitter, but the yellow of the flower is not. I throw several young dandelion leaves in . . . → Read More: Roasted Dandelion Root Smells Like Chocolate Chip Cookies Baking and the Best Syrup You’ve Ever Tasted, by Jill Kuhel

Violet Leaves and Flowers: Delicious and Nutritious, by Jill Kuhel

Violet leaves and flowers are edible giving us vitamin C and A. I add violet leaves to my lunch salad. The flowers make a lovely edible garnish on fruit salads, soups, drinks or desserts. I freeze the flowers in ice cubes to add to drinks in the winter when I long for a taste . . . → Read More: Violet Leaves and Flowers: Delicious and Nutritious, by Jill Kuhel

Purslane: You Find it in the Cracks, by Jill Kuhel

Purslane has more omega 3 than any other leafy green. Purslane is easy to find in the cracks of the sidewalk. Kay Young substitutes the purslane for lettuce in tacos or sandwiches. Bonus no chopping or wilting! The leaves can be eaten raw or cooked. I vote for raw~the less work the better! I . . . → Read More: Purslane: You Find it in the Cracks, by Jill Kuhel

Eating Onion Chives from the Yard, by Jill Kuhel

Wednesday eating from your yard tip~Onion chives are one of my top five favorite herbs! Both the flowers and the leaves have a sudtle onion flavor. My favorite way to eat chives are chopped up and heated with a quarter size of oil to flavor the oil before I throw in my eggs. The . . . → Read More: Eating Onion Chives from the Yard, by Jill Kuhel

Come Into Our Scandinavian-American Kitchens, by Mark Erickson

Garrison Keillor has occasionally referenced the basement of a Lutheran church as well as a dinner entrée called a casserole (aka hotdish) during his successful, long-running radio show, A Prairie Home Companion. I was raised in a denomination, i.e., the Evangelical Covenant Church (ECC), which is similar to Lutheran (two sacraments: baptism and communion). . . . → Read More: Come Into Our Scandinavian-American Kitchens, by Mark Erickson

Catnip (Nepeta cataria) From Hangmen to Love Potions, by Jill Kuhel

My grandson loves cats, but he struggles to understand that you can’t tell a cat what to do. I have found catnip to be the same way.

Last summer my neighbor came by for some catnip for his cat, but the patch I had planted in the parkway, for people’s easy access, was . . . → Read More: Catnip (Nepeta cataria) From Hangmen to Love Potions, by Jill Kuhel

Man Turns His House Into Indoor Cat Playland and Our Hearts Explode

This is my new favorite video. This house should be made into a national historic place. I’m a little surprised there hasn’t already been a reality show…

Dave the Dog Refused to Eat, by John Moe

Dave the dog, at least partly, may have been named after East Portland Davey

Dave the dog refused to eat until the broom was moved away from the food dish. He fears brooms and doesn’t understand them. He’s been known to bark loudly at them and bite them. Once the broom was moved, he . . . → Read More: Dave the Dog Refused to Eat, by John Moe