Recent Posts

Momma These Trees Were Meant to Die, by Davin Michael Stedman

I had a moment tonight remembering what real journalism feels like. A United States can’t elect a Donald Trump unless they have been inoculated by a critical mass of Opioids and click bait.

Yes, The New York Times has a slant. All papers have an audience and a point of view. I am not . . . → Read More: Momma These Trees Were Meant to Die, by Davin Michael Stedman

The Hunt for Goldeneye, by Davin Michael Stedman

When I go back to Jamaica, one of my goals I am sending the mysterious German manager Lennart Tacke, is filming myself playing my Bond song at Goldeneye.

Of course I haven’t written my Bond song yet. But I told Scott Rowe I would pen such a tune for our Brighton band Sherlock . . . → Read More: The Hunt for Goldeneye, by Davin Michael Stedman

Pat Thomas to Hold Book Signings in Portland and Seattle for his New Work, Did It! From Yippie To Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, An American Revolutionary

World-renowned cultural historian, author and longtime friend of East Portland Blog, Pat Thomas, will soon be coming to Portland and Seattle to celebrate the release of his new book, Did It! From Yippie To Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, An American Revolutionary.

Did It has received many excellent reviews and write-ups, including this article in . . . → Read More: Pat Thomas to Hold Book Signings in Portland and Seattle for his New Work, Did It! From Yippie To Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, An American Revolutionary

If We Could All Be Giants, by Davin Michael Stedman

I am not going to comment right now on the insane machine gun slaughter at a country music concert in Vegas, or tell you yet what Tom Petty means to me. But I will head into work to trim that sweet legal erb and keep getting a little smarter and laughing out loud a . . . → Read More: If We Could All Be Giants, by Davin Michael Stedman

The August of Our Folly, by Davin Michael Stedman

Do you think our military might be dangerously overextended if we can’t ‘invade’ Puerto Rico and help what is inevitably going to be our 51st State?

The National Guard should not be in Iraq and Afghanistan. That is a sign of Imperial stupidity. Folly in every sense.

Sun Tzu would have some interesting things . . . → Read More: The August of Our Folly, by Davin Michael Stedman

Interesting Perspectives From John Le Carre on Fresh Air

Yesterday, the NPR show Fresh Air featured the legendary spy novelist, John Le Carre. Over the course of the interview, Le Carre offered some interesting perspectives on the current investigations of the Trump campaign. If nothing else, the interview is worth a listen solely for the opportunity to hear a cultured and authoritative English . . . → Read More: Interesting Perspectives From John Le Carre on Fresh Air

A Visual Masterpiece, But Not For The Faint Of Heart, by Chuck Strom

Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk, which depicts the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force in May 1940 from France, is a visual and auditory masterpiece, but it’s not for the faint of heart. Starting from the opening moments, with only the barest of credits to initiate the proceedings, the audience endures just under two hours of . . . → Read More: A Visual Masterpiece, But Not For The Faint Of Heart, by Chuck Strom

Ten Sports Books For That Special Someone On Your Christmas List, by Chuck Strom

Sports books don’t come anywhere close to romance novels in their share of the publishing market, but there are still enough of them out there to present a bewildering array of choices for someone looking to purchase a gift for that special someone who likes to consume sports on the page as well as . . . → Read More: Ten Sports Books For That Special Someone On Your Christmas List, by Chuck Strom

Dear Sugar Was Here In Portland, Speaking Straight Into Our Ears, by Chuck Strom

Cheryl Strayed, Sarah Hepola and Steve Almond

Cheryl Strayed, whose memoir, Wild, became a successful movie with Reese Witherspoon, is a good storyteller whose online talks and Q&As never contain a dull moment. It was during one of my searches for her talks that I learned that she had resurrected her advice column, Dear . . . → Read More: Dear Sugar Was Here In Portland, Speaking Straight Into Our Ears, by Chuck Strom

Just Next Door to Portland – The Willamette Valley Wine Country, by Chuck Strom

Oregon’s Willamette Valley has some of the best wine country on Earth, especially if you’re into the Pinot Noir variety that Rex Pickett made famous with his novels Sideways and Vertical, the latter of which is set in Oregon. For those who live in Portland or are just visiting, most of the wineries are . . . → Read More: Just Next Door to Portland – The Willamette Valley Wine Country, by Chuck Strom

Come Into Our Scandinavian-American Kitchens, by Mark Erickson

Garrison Keillor has occasionally referenced the basement of a Lutheran church as well as a dinner entrée called a casserole (aka hotdish) during his successful, long-running radio show, A Prairie Home Companion. I was raised in a denomination, i.e., the Evangelical Covenant Church (ECC), which is similar to Lutheran (two sacraments: baptism and communion). . . . → Read More: Come Into Our Scandinavian-American Kitchens, by Mark Erickson

RIP John Trudell, by Daniel Housman

John Trudell, poet, activist for American Indian rights, dies at age 69

RIP John Trudell.

I’ll never forget hearing him speak 20 years ago in a basement hall at the University of Washington, at a time when the case of Leonard Peltier was getting renewed attention (which did not result in his pardon), . . . → Read More: RIP John Trudell, by Daniel Housman

Jack Kerouac – October in the Railroad Earth

Television host Steve Allen plays the piano on this and it forms a moment of unusual beauty. Here’s Jack Kerouac, our latter day Whitman, singing the body electric in old school San Francisco. He uses the word “fellaheen” a half century before middle eastern class and sectarian struggles would dominate the headlines. Something in . . . → Read More: Jack Kerouac – October in the Railroad Earth

Superman’s Imaginary Stories, by Rich Horton

Back in the days before Marvel’s more “realistic” super heroes overthrew DC’s dominance in the comics marketplace, DC would sometimes feature what they referred to as “imaginary stories,” which was a rather endearing way of saying the plot pursued an alternative story arc that didn’t fit in the overall fictional continuity of the characters . . . → Read More: Superman’s Imaginary Stories, by Rich Horton

Split-Fountain Hieroglyphics: Psychedelic Concert Posters From the Seattle Area 1966-1969, by Art Chantry

last wednesday, i was honored to be at a book signing event for a rather momentous and very important little poster book project. scott mcdougall is one of the best experts i’ve ever met on all things psychedelia. his own artwork (he desgned the cover, for instance) is enough to entrench him into the . . . → Read More: Split-Fountain Hieroglyphics: Psychedelic Concert Posters From the Seattle Area 1966-1969, by Art Chantry

Greg Graffin – Faith Alone – Will Appear at Hawthorne Theater, Portland 9/23

Author and Bad Religion member Greg Graffin has shared “Faith Alone”, one of his own songs that thematically inspired his new book, Population Wars. The full series including “My Poor Friend Me”, “The Answer”, “Changing Tide” are available on an limited edition exclusive 7-inch available for pre-order with Population Wars at kingsroadmerch.com/badreligion.

With . . . → Read More: Greg Graffin – Faith Alone – Will Appear at Hawthorne Theater, Portland 9/23

Frank Gifford, RIP, by Chuck Strom

This post was a nice surprise. Not just that someone would have had the presence of mind to mention Freddy Exley, but that apparently Gifford and Exley came to know each other after A Fan’s Notes, and that Gifford even hosted a party for Exley when his last book came out.

http://news.yahoo.com/frank-gifford-death-fred-exley-a-fans-notes-220404916.html

One . . . → Read More: Frank Gifford, RIP, by Chuck Strom

One of the Coolest Books About the USA Ever Made, by Art Chantry

Robert Frank’s game-changing book THE AMERICANS, published in 1958 by Grove Press (there was a different edition published in france a year earlier with essays many assorted french intellectuals (and cover art by saul steinberg). the american edition had a single essay by jack kerouac. the project itself was funded by a Guggenhiem Grant.

. . . → Read More: One of the Coolest Books About the USA Ever Made, by Art Chantry

Mark Blake – Pretend You’re in a War: The Who and the Sixties, by Pat Thomas

Starting in the early 70s, I’ve never had a casual relationship with The Who – just like I’ve never had a casual connection to my head, heart or groin. The Who always exemplified the visceral, mercurial, macho, homoerotic, thunderous, vulnerable side of rock music, they made me feel more alive reflecting my changing moods. . . . → Read More: Mark Blake – Pretend You’re in a War: The Who and the Sixties, by Pat Thomas

‘Life Itself’ shows Roger Ebert ravaged by cancer, but engaged till the end, By RANDY RENDFELD

The documentary “Life Itself” shows film critic Roger Ebert in a less than flattering light. In a society that celebrates youth and vitality, some might find it shocking that we see Ebert’s face ravaged by cancer. We see shots of his final days when he’s unable to walk or talk. Yet he was able . . . → Read More: ‘Life Itself’ shows Roger Ebert ravaged by cancer, but engaged till the end, By RANDY RENDFELD